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  • #AMB-03 Antique Chinese Hand-Carved Amber Toggle of Monkeys

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  • #AMB-15

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  • #ART-001

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  • #ART-003 An Ancient Handmade Iron Pot with Qian-Long Mark

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    This large size beautiful iron pot with a great texture and a beautiful design was made in traditional style in separate sections before being welded together. The top, made in six separate sections, nears the thick rim carries a key design and other patterns while the bottom part, also made in six sections, has a wave design and various other patterns. The larger middle which was also made in six separate panels containing mostly floral design with one panel designated for characters such as "Qing Dynasty Qian-Long Fifty-Six Years (大清乾隆五十六年)“ and ”welded on September ? (九月?日鑄)“ and another panel with characters for location where it was made (樓院綘州北關金火匠) in ancient character and the names of the three metalsmiths. The body of the pot has two carrying handles with loops. The whole pot with a heavy weight is supported by three feet each with an animal head or a deity face. The usage of the pot is unknown. Dimensions: 31"H x 32"W x 37"D (including the handles)

  • #ART-004 A Pair of Massive Size Antique Wooden Gates Fully Clothed in Hand-Forged Iron Work

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    This pair of massive size wooden gates fully clothed in hand-forged iron work looks like it could stop a whole army from invasion. Made with a purpose of showing the importance of the compound or a location it tried to protect, this impressive pair of gates gave an impression to many who said that it reminded them of the Forbidden City. With the complexity and the amount of time it took to create handmade iron work like this one with great texture and beautiful detail which separates it from any other ones made without the real handwork, this pair of compound gates has a great story behind its work. This pair of gates with the hand-beat and hand-forged iron work (including the many iron nails) is among disappearing arts and professions in modern China as few craftsmen can perform this type of metal work any more. This work was said to have traditionally been performed in a highly heated environment while the pupil handed tools and learned by watching only as the master concentrated in the work in a high temperature without splitting attention by talking. Hence, this work was generally taught in a non-verbal fashion. This pair of gates was carefully designed with each door containing nine larger size iron nails painted in gilt on each iron strip or belt. It also contains nine horizontal strips or belts in between the top and the bottom belt which frame each door. The design matches a Chinese idiom: Nine by nine is supreme. Traditionally, this pair of compound gates would have been placed under a larger and possibly elaborately carved wooden frame. The feet of the gates were placed on the indented circular carved holes on a pair of carved stone bases with carved Fu-lions. Stone steps were created where one would step up to enter the opened gate and stepped down to a court yard area. Dimensions (each door): 49” W x 4” D x 108” H

  • ART-005 A Pair of Early Antique Wooden Gates with Elaborate Hand-Made Iron Decoration

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    This pair of impressive antique Chinese compound gates/ doors with elaborate hand-forged iron decoration is from the late Ming to early Qing period. On the more detailed photos offered, one can see the texture and the thickness of the hand-beaten iron work which differs from the reproduced pieces using quickly rusted flat iron sheet, cutting to the shapes of the objects desired. This kind of hand-forged iron work that is time consuming and often a long process of years to produce one piece of work is among a list of disappearing Chinese arts. It was said that this kind of skill of working in iron was passed down visually rather than verbally because of the type of concentration needed working in a highly heated environment for a long time. The master concentrated in doing the actual work while the pupil stood behind watching and handing the tools. The motifs on the ironwork here include: the coin design (the wealth), “Shou” character (longevity) in an early style, bat (blessing), and other twined leafy and floral patterns. Some of them are worn and some might have had repairs. A new lacquer coat was applied onto the iron work to prevent the iron from rusting more. At the back of this pair of doors with very thick depth, comes the attached compartment of wood and metal for locking the doors. The compound doors were often used as the entrance of enclosed walls that protected and concealed a whole architectural living structure with court yard space inside the outer walls and sometimes in between the actual dwelling or dwellings. Dimensions: 29 1/2" W x 95" H x 7 5/8" D

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